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Landmark Ruling: Julian Assange Granted Right to Appeal Extradition to US, UK Court Decides

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High Court Grants Julian Assange Right to Appeal Extradition to US Following Supporters' Cheers in London

London's High Court has delivered a significant legal victory to Julian Assange, allowing him the right to appeal in his final challenge against extradition to the United States. Jubilant supporters gathered outside the court in the British capital, beating drums and chanting "drop the case," while placards bearing messages like "Let him go Joe" echoed the sentiment.

During Monday's hearing, Assange's legal team argued against the acceptance of assurances from US prosecutors regarding his rights under the First Amendment, emphasizing potential discrimination based on his Australian nationality if extradited. Judges Victoria Sharp and Jeremy Johnson sided with Assange's team, deeming US submissions insufficient and granting permission for a full appeal on grounds concerning freedom of speech and nationality. A date for the next hearing is yet to be determined.

Facing espionage charges related to WikiLeaks' publication of classified documents, Assange could spend the remainder of his life in prison if convicted by US authorities. His wife, Stella Assange, hailed the ruling as a turning point, denouncing the US case as an affront to democratic principles and press freedom.

Activist Redde Jean-Baptiste highlighted the immense pressure on Assange, who has been grappling with the weight of a case determining his fate. Nevertheless, Monday's ruling offered a glimmer of hope, signaling a potential shift in fortunes.

Earlier delays in the extradition decision revolved around assurances regarding First Amendment protections and the death penalty. The court was informed that the US would not pursue the death penalty should Assange be extradited, providing a pivotal update in the ongoing legal battle.

High Court Grants Julian Assange Right to Appeal Extradition to US Following Supporters' Cheers in London

London's High Court has delivered a significant legal victory to Julian Assange, allowing him the right to appeal in his final challenge against extradition to the United States. Jubilant supporters gathered outside the court in the British capital, beating drums and chanting "drop the case," while placards bearing messages like "Let him go Joe" echoed the sentiment.

During Monday's hearing, Assange's legal team argued against the acceptance of assurances from US prosecutors regarding his rights under the First Amendment, emphasizing potential discrimination based on his Australian nationality if extradited. Judges Victoria Sharp and Jeremy Johnson sided with Assange's team, deeming US submissions insufficient and granting permission for a full appeal on grounds concerning freedom of speech and nationality. A date for the next hearing is yet to be determined.

Facing espionage charges related to WikiLeaks' publication of classified documents, Assange could spend the remainder of his life in prison if convicted by US authorities. His wife, Stella Assange, hailed the ruling as a turning point, denouncing the US case as an affront to democratic principles and press freedom.

Activist Redde Jean-Baptiste highlighted the immense pressure on Assange, who has been grappling with the weight of a case determining his fate. Nevertheless, Monday's ruling offered a glimmer of hope, signaling a potential shift in fortunes.

Earlier delays in the extradition decision revolved around assurances regarding First Amendment protections and the death penalty. The court was informed that the US would not pursue the death penalty should Assange be extradited, providing a pivotal update in the ongoing legal battle.

US Government Assures No Death Penalty for Julian Assange, Amid Renewed Scrutiny on Extradition Case

Amid ongoing legal battles, documents submitted by lawyers representing the US government affirm that Julian Assange will not face trial for a death-eligible offense. This revelation comes as Assange, the Australian whistleblower, marks 12 years since he last experienced freedom. For the past five years, he has been confined in London's high-security Belmarsh prison, following nearly seven years of seeking refuge in the Ecuadorian embassy to evade arrest. Throughout his ordeal, Assange has maintained that his extradition is politically motivated.

Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of The Guardian, reflected on his past collaboration with Assange, describing it as a "bumpy ride" but also "groundbreaking." Rusbridger criticized the US case against Assange, characterizing it as an attempt to silence whistleblowers and intimidate journalists from pursuing inconvenient truths.

The evolving saga of Assange continues to raise questions about press freedom, government transparency, and the treatment of whistleblowers. As the legal battle unfolds, the world watches closely, contemplating the implications for journalistic integrity and democratic principles.

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